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Vocal cord dysfunction in children
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Vocal cord dysfunction in children

Author: Blakeslee E Noyes; James S Kemp Affiliation: St Louis University School of Medicine and SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, 1465 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, Missouri, USA
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, v8 n2 (2007): 155-163
  Peer-reviewed
Other Databases: WorldCatWorldCat
Summary:
Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Blakeslee E Noyes; James S Kemp Affiliation: St Louis University School of Medicine and SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, 1465 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, Missouri, USA
ISSN:1526-0542
DOI: 10.1016/j.prrv.2007.05.004
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4934076341
Awards:

Abstract:

Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.
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