Constructed criteria: redefining merit to justify discrimination. (Article, 2005) [McGill University Library]
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Constructed criteria: redefining merit to justify discrimination.
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Constructed criteria: redefining merit to justify discrimination.

Author: E Uhlmann Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. eric.uhlmann@yale.edu; GL Cohen
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Psychological science, 2005 Jun; 16(6): 474-80
  Peer-reviewed
Other Databases: WorldCatWorldCat
Summary:
This article presents an account of job discrimination according to which people redefine merit in a manner congenial to the idiosyncratic credentials of individual applicants from desired groups. In three studies, participants assigned male and female applicants to gender-stereotypical jobs. However, they did not view male and female applicants as having different strengths and weaknesses. Instead, they redefined  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: E Uhlmann Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. eric.uhlmann@yale.edu; GL Cohen
ISSN:0956-7976
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 110254530
Awards:

Abstract:

This article presents an account of job discrimination according to which people redefine merit in a manner congenial to the idiosyncratic credentials of individual applicants from desired groups. In three studies, participants assigned male and female applicants to gender-stereotypical jobs. However, they did not view male and female applicants as having different strengths and weaknesses. Instead, they redefined the criteria for success at the job as requiring the specific credentials that a candidate of the desired gender happened to have. Commitment to hiring criteria prior to disclosure of the applicant's gender eliminated discrimination, suggesting that bias in the construction of hiring criteria plays a causal role in discrimination.
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