Weak Island semantics (eBook, 2014) [McGill University Library]
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Weak Island semantics

Author: Márta Abrusán
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014.
Series: Oxford studies in semantics and pragmatics, 3.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
This volume presents a novel semantic account of weak islands, structures that block the displacement of certain elements in a sentence. Dr Abrusan's argument that the behaviour of these constructions has a semantic rather than syntactic explanation removes some of the most important reasons for postulating abstract syntactic rules as part of universal grammar.
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Abrusán, Márta, 1978-
Weak Island semantics.
(DLC) 2013940813
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Márta Abrusán
ISBN: 9780191664984 0191664987 9780191757426 019175742X
Language Note: English.
OCLC Number: 874163763
Description: 1 online resource (260 pages) : illustrations
Contents: Cover; Weak Island Semantics; Copyright; Contents; General preface; Acknowledgments; 1: Introduction; 1.1 Introduction; 1.1.1 Islands: a brief overview; 1.1.2 Weak islands: making a case for a semantic solution; 1.2 Previous proposals; 1.2.1 Syntactic proposals: Rizzi (1990), Cinque (1990); 1.2.2 Intervention effects: Beck (1996); 1.2.3 Towards a semantic approach: Kroch (1989); 1.2.4 Szabolcsi and Zwarts (1993), and its extensions in Honcoop (1998); 1.2.4.1 What-for split and dynamic semantics: Honcoop (1998); 1.2.5 Negative degree islands: Rullmann (1995) and Fox and Hackl (2007) 1.2.5.1 Rullmann (1995)1.2.5.2 Wrong predictions; 1.2.5.3 Fox and Hackl's (2007) account: Dense scales; 1.2.6 Oshima (2007); 1.3 Basic assumptions about the semantics of questions; 1.3.1 Hamblin and plurals: an ordering; 1.3.2 Karttunen; 1.3.3 The maximal answer: Dayal (1996), Jacobson (1995); 1.3.4 The complete answer; 1.3.5 An example: positive and negative questions about individuals; 1.3.6 The Maximal Informativity Principle; 1.4 Overview of the main arguments in the book; 1.4.1 The central claim; 1.4.2 Presuppositional islands (Chapter 2); 1.4.3 Negative islands (Chapter 3) 1.4.4 Wh-islands (Chapter 4)1.4.5 Quasi-islands and quantificational intervention (Chapter 5); 1.4.6 Contradiction and grammaticality (Chapter 6); 2: Presuppositional Islands; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Presuppositions of questions; 2.2.1 Questions about individuals: universal projection; 2.2.2 Identity questions; 2.3 Presuppositional islands with factive verbs; 2.3.1 Questions about manners; 2.3.1.1 About manner predicates and contraries; 2.3.1.2 Manner questions; 2.3.1.3 Obviation phenomena; 2.3.2 Degree questions; 2.3.3 How many questions: scope ambiguity; 2.4 Extensions 2.4.1 Extraposition islands2.4.2 Weak triggers; 2.4.3 A problem? Response stance predicates; 2.4.4 Islands created by only; 2.5 Summary; 3: Negative Islands; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Fox and Hackl (2007), Maximal Informativity; 3.3 Negative islands created by manner adverbials; 3.3.1 About manner predicates; 3.3.2. The proposal: negative islands with manner questions; 3.3.3. Blindness; 3.3.4 Ways to rescue negative islands; 3.3.4.1 Modals; 3.3.4.2 Explicit domains; 3.4 Negative islands with degree questions; 3.4.1. The solution proposed; 3.4.1.1 Positive degree questions
Series Title: Oxford studies in semantics and pragmatics, 3.
Responsibility: Márta Abrusán.

Abstract:

This book presents a novel semantic account of weak islands, structures that block the displacement of certain elements in a sentence. Dr Abrusan's argument that the behaviour of these constructions  Read more...
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